Rotary Gazebo Ribbon Cutting Ceremony May 20th

 

It's officially open! President Elect Basil Kuzyszyn, President John Marshall and Gazebo Project Chair Jim Clabough helped Mayor Pro Tem Albert Yount cut the ribbon.

It’s officially open! President Elect Basil Kuzyszyn, President John Marshall and Gazebo Project Chair Jim Clabough helped Mayor Pro Tem Albert Yount cut the ribbon.

 

Mayor Pro Tem Albert Yount thanked everyone involved and pointed out that the Gazebo was built debt-free.

Mayor Pro Tem Albert Yount thanked everyone involved and pointed out that the Gazebo was built debt-free.

 

Town Manager Scott Fogelman thanked all those who contributed to the project.

Town Manager Scott Fogelman thanked all those who contributed to the project.

 

Club President John Marshall made a few comments about what the club does for the community.

Club President John Marshall made a few comments about what the club does for the community.

 

Rotary Gazebo Plaque

Rotary Gazebo Plaque

 

Rotary Gazebo Complete

 

Members of the club pose in front of the new Rotary Gazebo.

Members of the club pose in front of the new Rotary Gazebo.

 

Members of the Watauga Community Band provided music for the festivities.

Members of the Watauga Community Band provided music for the festivities.

 

Although Mayor J.B. Lawrence was out of town, First Lady Lynn Lawrence did a beautiful job of singing our National Anthem.

Although Mayor J.B. Lawrence was out of town, First Lady Lynn Lawrence did a beautiful job of singing our National Anthem.

 

Photos by Della Marshall.

Meeting Report May 4, 2015

J&M PRODUCE

It's strawberry season again! Anne Fisher passed this big bowl of beautiful strawberries around to everyone as CeCe Fontaine told the history of J&M Produce. It's the one on Highway 321 about halfway between Boone and Blowing Rock. She and her husband, Mike Shore, resurrected his family's business from retirement and built it into the area's premier produce stand. Fascinating Fact: J&M Produce sold 17,000 pumpkins last fall!

It’s strawberry season again! Anne Fisher passed this big bowl of beautiful strawberries around to everyone as CeCe Fontaine told the history of J&M Produce. It’s the one on Highway 321 about halfway between Boone and Blowing Rock. She and her husband, Mike Shore, resurrected his family’s business from retirement and built it into the area’s premier produce stand. Fascinating Fact: J&M Produce sold 17,000 pumpkins last fall!

 

Chip's Champions lead the race in this year's horse show derby with Sharon's Secretariats close behind. The deadline is just a couple of weeks away, so get your horses galloping! Horse Show Chair Jim Clabough said we are on track to top $35,000 in ad sales this year, well above the $30,000 sold last year!

Chip’s Champions lead the race in this year’s horse show derby with Sharon’s Secretariats close behind. The deadline is just a couple of weeks away, so get your horses galloping! Horse Show Chair Jim Clabough said we are on track to top $35,000 in ad sales this year, well above the $30,000 sold last year!

 

Chuckles the Horse (rumored to be Cullie Tarleton, but we're not sure) served as greeter for the meeting. The last time we saw Chuckles he was feasting on that bowl of strawberries from J&M Produce.

Chuckles the Horse (rumored to be Cullie Tarleton, but we’re not sure) served as greeter for the meeting. The last time we saw Chuckles he was feasting on that bowl of strawberries from J&M Produce.

 

Meeting Report April 27, 2015

It Ain’t Rocket Science: Running the Orchard at Altapass

 

The Orchard at Altpass is just off the Blue Ridge Parkway at milepost 328.3

The Orchard at Altpass is just off the Blue Ridge Parkway at milepost 328.3.

 

Bill Carson is a member of the Spruce Pine Rotary club. And, yes, he really was a rocket scientist.

Bill Carson is a member of the Spruce Pine Rotary club. And, yes, he really was a rocket scientist. And, yes, he is a comedian too. Bill kept our Rotarians laughing with his humorous take on their adventure.

 

Bill and his wife Judy run the Orchard at Altapass. Bill worked for IBM in Huntsville, Alabama on computer guidance for rockets. He and Judy retired to Little Switzerland 22 years ago. He tried weaving and admits that was a bust. When the Orchard at Altapass came up for sale he and Judy ended up buying it after only “two hours of due diligence”. It turned out their quick action prevented a developer from using the property to build a housing development right off the Parkway. Bill later realized the historical significance of the property when he saw a column of Revolutionary War soldiers coming down their driveway as part of their re-enactment of the march to Kings Mountain which was the site of a pivotal battle. And he later found out one of his ancestors was part of that battle.

He and Judy (who will soon celebrate their 54th wedding anniversary) decided to preserve the Orchard at Altapass and made it a non-profit organization. They also put the property in conservancy to prevent any future development.

Bill said they feature 200 musical performances six months out of the year that feature many of the “From Heres” in the mountains.


Klaus Schirow presented our club with yet another banner from his trip to Europe. Klaus has been a Rotarian since 1961 and a member of our club for 30 years!

Klaus Schirow presented our club with yet another banner from his trip to Europe. Klaus has been a Rotarian since 1961 and a member of our club for 30 years!

The 2015 District 7670 Conference

 

2015-discon-logoSeveral of our members attended the 2014-15 District 7670 conference at the Omni Hotel in Charlotte over the weekend. The district leadership honored our club with several awards: The Governor’s Distinguished Club Award (one of twelve clubs to receive this award), Honorable Mention for the Best Club Website Award, 2nd place in total giving to the C.A.R.T. fund and 3rd place in per capita giving to the C.A.R.T. fund.

We were especially proud to see our Vocational Services Chair, Chuck Canady, receive the prestigious Rotary International Vocational Service Award. For the past two years, which are also his first two years in our club, Chuck has done a wonderful job of managing our Dictionary Project, our Watauga High School Scholarship program and Career Day at Holmes Center at Appalachian State University. The Avery County Schools Superintendent, David Burleson was so impressed last year that he wants to bring his 8th grade students to Career Day this year. This will nearly double attendance from 350 to over 600 students.

Those who attended the conference were: John and Della Marshall, Basil and Penny Kuzyzsyn, Jim and Karen Clabough, Chuck and Kathy Canady, Virginia Vanstory and Bill and Barbara Parker.

Highlight photos are below. You can see many more by clicking here:

2015 District Conference Photo Gallery

Club President John Marshall congratulates Chuck on his Rotary International Vocational Service award.

Club President John Marshall congratulates Chuck on his Rotary International Vocational Service award.

 

More award badges to put on our club banner!

 

2015 Gov Distinguished Club 2015 Gov Club Website Honorable Mention

 

 

 

 

 

 

2015 2nd CART total giving 2 2015 3rd CART per capita

 

 

 

 

 

 

Club President John Marshall accepts the Governor's Distinguished Club award badge from District Governor Gary Bray.

Club President John Marshall accepts the Governor’s Distinguished Club award badge from District Governor Gary Bray.

Spring Blood Drive Yields 42 Pints!

red-cross-logoOur spring blood drive at Rumple Church was a big success. The total donated for the day was 42 pints!

Thanks to all who helped: Ray Pickett, Ann Williams, Betty Howe, Joe Dyer, Jim West and Jim Clabough and Joe Kiker. And thanks to all the donors!

 

 

Blood Drive 4-21-15 Pickett

Ray Pickett gets stuck for a good cause. Interesting fact: The equipment to his left to draw blood costs $70,000. Cute pasties, Ray!

Blood Drive April 2015 JIm West

Our blood drive Chair Jim West reads over material just before donating his pint.

 

Meeting Report: April 20, 2015

FIELD TRIP TO THE MAY SCHOOL OF NURSING
AT LEES-MCRAE COLLEGE

Fourteen members of our club toured this very impressive facility last Monday. Dr. Laura Fero, Dean of Nursing and Health Sciences, said that the coming year will be their first year with just 24 students. Once they polish up the program she will accept up to 60 students and then eventually 200.

Daniel and Dianne May, already major benefactors of the college, donated $4 millilon of the total $6.2 milllion dollar cost of the facility. The entire project was completed with donated funds so the college did not have to take on any debt.

Club members that toured the facility were: John Marshall, Basil Kuzyzsyn, Greg Davis, Bill Leahey, Virginia Vanstory, Jim Clabough, Betty Howe, Charles Hardin, Ann Williams, Van Joffrion, Sabine Miller and Ray Pickett.

Dr. Barry Buxton, PhD, the President of Lees-McRae College since 2000, grew up in Blowing Rock. He greeted us at the door and later joined us for lunch for a video presentation about the school. For most of the club members it was the first time eating in a college cafeteria in decades. It was pretty good!

Laura Fero,  PhD, RN is the Dean of Nursing and Health Sciences. Here she greeted our club members at the entrance and gave us an overview of the $6.2 million facility.

Laura Fero, PhD, RN is the Dean of Nursing and Health Sciences. Here she greeted our club members at the entrance and gave us an overview of the $6.2 million facility.

 

Dr. Fero shows how the ambulance mockup works. Students learn how to receive patients from the ambulance and move them  to the elevator and into a treatment room, just like it would be in a real hospital setting.

Dr. Fero shows how the ambulance mockup works. As part of the Emergency Medical Systems Management program students learn how to receive patients from the ambulance and move them to the elevator and into a treatment room, just like it would be in a real hospital setting.

 

The May School of Nursing has several human simulators such as this one. They talk (with the help of teachers in the control room). They also cough, cry and even bleed. One of the human simulators is a mother that can give birth! They each cost about $100,000.

The May School of Nursing has several human simulators such as this one. They talk (with the help of teachers in the control room). They also cough, cry and even bleed. One of the human simulators is a mother that can even give birth! They each cost about $100,000.

 

Real cadavers are very expensive to dissect, so this simulator recreates it at a much lower cost. Dr. Fero said a full dissection facility would cost over $500,000 and each cadaver costs $25,000. This Anatomage simulator costs a relatively less expensive $77,000. With it students can roll the simulated cadaver over and expose it's muscles, bones and organs just by pressing a slide switch on the table screen.

Real cadavers are very expensive to dissect, so this simulator recreates it at a much lower cost. Dr. Fero said a full dissection facility would cost over $500,000 and each cadaver costs $25,000. This Anatomage simulator costs a relatively less expensive $77,000. With it students can roll the simulated cadaver over and expose it’s muscles, bones and organs just by pressing a slide switch on the table screen.